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PARLIAMENT OF INDIA ANNEXE EXTN

REPUBLIC OF INDIA, New Delhi

Client: Central Public Works Department
Master Planner & Architects: CPWD
Area: 8.80 Acres
Landscape Cost: 32.00 Crores
Status: Completed

The Parliament House Annex, designed with emphasis on economy, simplicity and functional utility, sought to bridge the gap between the traditional and the modern, while respecting the identity of the main Parliament House. The annex building—with a touch of Indian values and tradition—required a suitable landscape setting for the end user to completely exercise the experience of the area.

The landscape design imbibes the geometry and balance, the elaborate stone work and the plentiful use of water to divide the open spaces and tries to reflect the scale and dignity in form of contemporary expressions of the imperial aesthetics.

A running central water channel with fountain spouts and a special floral petal fountain graces the principal axes, reinforcing the focus of the visitor. In the water body, ten pillars created out of stone jaalis have prominent capitals with mouldings which, while adding to the lighting effect at night, enhance the richness of the drive-in experience. The axis, composed of water and pillars, reinstate the concept of power and order, reminiscent of the most prominent architectural feature of the parliament, as we approach the building. Stone-cut floral fountains and bollards, planter bowls on pedestals, and stone-molded handrails on retaining walls mark the styling components inspired by the imperial past but expressed in contemporary forms.

A pergola connection to Annex Block-B leads to a plaza with a water feature, which is proposed to be an active congregation zone between the existing and the new blocks. An existing ramp has been realigned to engage its geometry in sync with the building thus providing opportunity to create symmetrical mounds and a lotus plaza garden. Overall, flowering shrubs, variegated ground covers and annual flower beds will continue the legacy of imperial garden softscapes along with tree palettes and faunal associations.